All Distinctions Levelled

Weather vane, 2016

A weathervane devised for Flood House which was made by Karen Green, a specialist in traditional copper weathervanes.

The design incorporates the word ‘LEVEL’ positioned above the east – west axis which alludes to the extreme changes in water levels that come with the rise and fall of the tide in the Thames Estuary. The word is also a reference to a speech by the 14th century radical itinerant priest John Ball. In one of his rousing sermons he rails against the injustices of the English tax system and the extreme inequalities that led to the Peasants Revolt of 1381, which began in Essex.

“My good friends, things cannot go on well in England, nor ever will until everything shall be in common, when there shall be neither vassal nor lord, and all distinctions levelled; when the lords shall be no more masters than ourselves. How ill they have used us!… They have wines, spices and fine bread, when we have only rye and the refuse of fine straw; and if we drink, it must be water. They have handsome seats and manors, when we must brave the wind and rain in our labours in the field; but it is from our labour they have the wherewith to support their pomp.… Let us go to the king, who is young, and remonstrate with him on our servitude, telling him we must have it otherwise, or that we shall find a remedy for it ourselves”

Excerpt from a speech by John Ball, documented by Jean Froissart in The Chronicles of England, France, Spain, 14th c. ‘LEVEL’ is a palindrome which makes it a perfect friend to a weathervane. The earliest English vane dates from c.1340, the period in which John Ball was preaching.

Commissioned by Focal Point Gallery 

Photography by Brotherton Lock
Process images courtesy of Karen Green

All Distinctions Levelled
All Distinctions Levelled
All Distinctions Levelled

Photography by Brotherton Lock

All Distinctions Levelled
All Distinctions Levelled

Courtesy of Karen Green